STRUCTURED WATER SERIES – ALBERT SZENT-GYORGYI

STRUCTURED WATER SERIES – ALBERT SZENT-GYORGYI

Water is universal to life.  Not just as a liquid needed for hydration, but as an essential player in every interaction between molecules and a carrier of information.  As one of the fundamental principles of vibrational medicine, water’s ability to form complex structures explains many of these phenomena, many of which are still new to science.  We hope that our structured water series will help practitioners to better understand the science and magic of water.

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Biochemist Albert Szent-Györgyi (1893-1986) explored the bioenergetic role of water in the human body with a special interest in the working of muscles. In “Water Structure and Bioenergetics” written in the 1950s, Szent-Györgyi explains some of these cellular mechanics including the relationship of ions and ATP in the contraction of muscle fibers:

Though mammalian muscle contains 10 percent actomyosin, owing to the great hydrophility of this protein, it is difficult to prepare actomyosin solution containing less than 97 percent water. Such an actomyosin solution, at physiological ionic concentration, form as a rigid gel.

Szent-Györgyi received the 1937 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine "for his discoveries in connection with the biological combustion process with special reference to vitamin C and the catalysis of fumaric acid." A fuller understanding of these cellular metabolic processes in the citric acid cycle was provided in 1937 by Hans Krebs – this cyclic process is also known as the Krebs Cycle.

Szent-Györgyi continued his research with a special focus on the molecular mechanics of muscles. He wrote about the crucial role of water that forms ‘lattices’ around myosin filaments:

It is difficult to explain this strong binding of water in any other way than by the formation of “icebergs” water lattices formed around the fibrous actomyosin particles. On addition of ATP, this water structure collapses, and the actomyosin becomes a practically anhydrous material. This collapse of the water structure declares itself to the observer as a contraction of the actomyosin thread.

These energetic water lattices are a type of “ice”, he suggests, that are part of all cells. In “Bioenergetics” written in 1956, he explores this idea and adds to the theory of muscle ‘contraction’ within classical biochemistry.

 

RELATED KITS

Energy (Krebs) Cycle & Glycolysis 

Period Table of Elements



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