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Glyphosate use & gut dysbiosis

Glyphosate use & gut dysbiosis

January 12, 2022

Early on, it was assumed that because humans do not have a shikimate enzyme pathway, we would be little impacted by the herbicide. It turns out, though, that bacteria in the human gut do have this pathway. And so, ingesting glyphosate will disrupt or destroy gut bacteria thereby interfering with digestion and promoting dysbiosis. According to a 2020 study in theJournal of Hazardous Materials, “54% of the human core gut bacterial species are potentially sensitive to glyphosate.”
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Geopathic Stress: what is it and what can it do?

Geopathic Stress: what is it and what can it do?

January 06, 2022

Geopathyis the fascinating study of the Earth's electro-magnetic radiations on the health of humans, animals and plants.Geopathic stress (GS) occurs when these energies are disrupted or altered (naturally or by human activity) thereby affecting the cells, glands, tissues and the electrical activity of the nervous system. These disruptions orgeopathic stressors include the frequencies of underground streams and cavities, certain mineral concentrations, fault lines, the movement/energies of wind, water/precipitation, change in temperature and pressure and many more.
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THOUGHTS ON ECZEMA

THOUGHTS ON ECZEMA

December 24, 2021

Eczema, also known as atopic dermatitis, is an allergic skin disease that usually develops in early childhood. From the Greek word “ekzema” for skin that “boils out” this rash is characterized by itchy papules that can form fluid-filled or crusted lesions. The skin in affected areas can thicken and is susceptible to cracking. In children, eczema frequently appears on the hands, wrists, crooks of arms and elbows, knees, face and neck. Subsequent bacterial and viral infections of the skin are common. 
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ACNE & THE GUT-BRAIN-SKIN AXIS

ACNE & THE GUT-BRAIN-SKIN AXIS

December 17, 2021

Acne is an inflammatory skin condition with lesions commonly blamed on increased sebum production, hyperkeratinisation, and colonization of Cutibacterium acnes (formerly called Propionibacterium acnes). 

New acne research has focused on the “gut-brain-skin axis” exploring the intersection of dysbiosis, stress and skin microbiota:

…the cutaneous microbiota in acne patients and acne-free individuals differ at the virulent-specific lineage level. Acne also has close connections with the gastrointestinal tract, and many argue that the gut microbiota could be involved in the pathogenic process of acne...

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PSORIASIS

PSORIASIS

December 16, 2021

Psoriasis is a chronic, autoimmune skin condition. It is characterised by the rapid regeneration and accumulation of keratinocytes resulting in raised, red patches that become scaly. Normal keratinocytes, the keratin-producing cells found in the basal layer of the skin, move gradually to the surface of the epidermis where they will die and flake off.  In people with psoriasis, this takes place over 3 to 7 days, whereas in normal skin it takes 3-4 weeks.
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MYOPIA

MYOPIA

December 06, 2021

Myopia, also known as nearsightedness, is a common cause of blurred vision that typically begins in childhood. An estimated 30% of Americans have myopia but this number is increasing.

Myopia is caused by a lengthening of the eyeball. The lens and cornea can also become unevenly or too curved, and this distorts light rays as they travel through the eyes, which is called refraction. This leads “the refractive image formed by the cornea and the lens to fall in front of the photoreceptors of the retina.” 

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Candidiasis and metals

Candidiasis and metals

November 15, 2021

Candida is normally present in humans, typically found on the skin and mucosal surfaces in the mouth, the throat and the GI tract, and the respiratory and urinary systems. Candida is an opportunistic pathogen, however, and overgrowth can occur in people whose defenses are compromised by immune dysfunction, immunosuppressive drugs or antibiotics.  This fungal overgrowth is considered an infection and is known as Candidiasis.
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Panic Attacks

Panic Attacks

October 26, 2021

A panic attack is a sudden onset of acute anxiety that is often mistaken for a life-threatening illness, and for those who suffer from recurrent attacks it can often be debilitating. Physical symptoms of an attack can include rapid heart rate, dizziness, shaking, nausea, abdominal cramping, numbness of the hands and feet, chest pain and shortness of breath.  Many people report feeling like they were going to die during these episodes, which can last for several minutes. 

About 23% of Americans report having experienced a panic attack while up to 4.7% of Americans with recurrent attacks have been diagnosed with panic disorder. Women are twice as likely as men to develop the condition. 

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Lyme disease

Lyme disease

October 05, 2021

According to Yale University researchers, the bacterium causing Lyme disease has circulated in the forests of North America for 60,000 years. Carried by ticks, the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi had been limited primarily to deer as their animal host. However, with forest fragmentation and a surge in the deer population, the ticks have multiplied, carrying the infection to other mammals including humans. 

Lyme disease came to public attention suddenly in the 1970s when a group of children in Lyme, Connecticut, began exhibiting odd symptoms – bull’s eye shaped rashes, swollen knees, partial paralysis, headaches, and fatigue.

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The Cytokine Storm

The Cytokine Storm

September 27, 2021

First coined in 1993 to describe an immune reaction to a bone marrow transplant, a ‘cytokine storm’ results from a sudden and uncontrolled increase in levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines that target the body’s own cells. This potentially life threatening autoimmune reaction can be triggered by infections, certain drugs and autoimmune conditions such as arthritis.
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Regenerating muscle mass

Regenerating muscle mass

September 18, 2021

While we all know that muscle can regenerate after strain or injury, muscle loss related to aging, known as sarcopenia, is a different kind of problem. Sarcopenia occurs gradually after age 40, typically leading to a 30-50% decrease in muscle mass by age 80. Research on how this process occurs and how to slow it down has identified a number of contributing factors. 
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The Cell Membrane

The Cell Membrane

September 14, 2021

So named in the 17th century after cellula or the tiny rooms used by monks, cells are what all life on Earth is made of. All plants and animals are made of cells, and they are the living foundations of the specialized tissues and organs that they rely on for survival. There are over a hundred different cells in the human body, and they all consist of an outer plasma membrane, nucleus and cytoplasm populated by fibres, membranes and organelles (only blood cells do not contain nuclei and certain organelles such as mitochondria).

A “fluid mosaic model” of the membrane developed in the 1970s offers an understanding of its sophisticated and complex mechanics.[1]

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