ANTI-AGING: THE ROLE OF FREE RADICALS & OXIDATIVE STRESS

ANTI-AGING: THE ROLE OF FREE RADICALS & OXIDATIVE STRESS

To help elucidate specific factors in skin aging, a 2015 study of humans and mice in Aging Cell examined “reductions in cell proliferation, collagen synthesis, extracellular matrix remodelling, and altered epidermal morphology.” And while acknowledging the role of hormones and external influences on skin health, researchers proposed that the drivers of aging skin cells are “reduced energy metabolism, higher mitochondrial oxidative stress and pronounced mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletions.” In short, the “mitochondrial free radical theory of aging.”

READ MORE:  https://www.ergopathics.com/blogs/news/exercise-mitochondrial-metabolism-skin-aging

What are free radicals?

Free radicals (FR) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as superoxide and hydrogen peroxide are oxygen-containing molecules with unpaired electrons. These unpaired electrons react easily with other molecules in the body in a processed called oxidation (loss of electrons). Oxidation is normal and necessary, ROS and FR are natural by-products of cellular respiration and infection.  They are neutralized by “an antioxidant defensive system based mainly on enzymatic components, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx).”[2]  Nature is filled with antioxidants, including vitamins like ascorbic acid, vitamins E and D, and thousands of phytomedicines in the plant world.  These antioxidants allow living things to repair damage caused by injury, infection, aging and decay in nature. 

When there is an imbalance between free radical activity and antioxidant activity, oxidative stress occurs.  Specific enzymes, vitamins, and metabolic pathways can be disrupted by the sensitivities and stressors in vial testing kits, and all effective treatment ultimately improves antioxidant function in the body by decreasing local and generalized stress.

Oxidative stress is a phenomenon caused by an imbalance between production and accumulation of oxygen reactive species (ROS) in cells and tissues and the ability of a biological system to detoxify these reactive products. ROS can play, and in fact they do it, several physiological roles (i.e., cell signaling), and they are normally generated as by-products of oxygen metabolism; despite this, environmental stressors (i.e., UV, ionizing radiations, pollutants, and heavy metals) and xenobiotics (i.e., antiblastic drugs) contribute to greatly increase ROS production, therefore causing the imbalance that leads to cell and tissue damage (oxidative stress)."

 

RELATED KITS

Skin & Connective Tissue

Glultathione

Detox Liver Pathways

Energy (Krebs) Cycle & Glycolysis

 

[1] https://www.healthline.com/health/oxidative-stress

[2] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5551541/

[3] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5551541/



Also in News

STRUCTURED WATER SERIES – ALBERT SZENT-GYORGYI
STRUCTURED WATER SERIES – ALBERT SZENT-GYORGYI

Water is universal to life.  Not just as a liquid needed for hydration, but as an essential player in every interaction between molecules and a carrier of information.  As one of the fundamental principles of vibrational medicine, water’s ability to form complex structures explains many of these phenomena, many of which are still new to science.  We hope that our structured water series will help practitioners to better understand the science and magic of water.

Biochemist Albert Szent-Györgyi (1893-1986) explored the bioenergetic role of water in the human body with a special interest in the working of muscles. In “Water Structure and Bioenergetics” written in the 1950s, Szent-Györgyi explains some of these cellular mechanics including the relationship of ions and ATP in the contraction of muscle fibers ...

Read More
ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE
ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE

New research in Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) has highlighted the role of microglia, unique brain macrophage-like cells responsible for “elimination of microbes, dead cells, redundant synapses, protein aggregates” and other particulates that may endanger the CNS.[1] In its complex role, however, this immune cell is implicated in significant neuroinflammation.
Read More
Histamine & Anti-Histamine
Histamine & Anti-Histamine

Allergy sufferers know too well the itchy, sneezing effects of the release of histamine. This neurotransmitter, produced primarily by white blood cells such as mast cells, eosinophils and basophils, can be suppressed with chemical antihistamines. Indeed, while histamine is involved in some 23 physiological functions including gastric acid release its most studied role is in the inflammatory response during an allergic reaction.
Read More

Subscribe