MYOPIA

MYOPIA

Myopia, also known as nearsightedness, is a common cause of blurred vision that typically begins in childhood. An estimated 30% of Americans have myopia but this number is increasing.[1]

Myopia is caused by a lengthening of the eyeball. The lens and cornea can also become unevenly or too curved, and this distorts light rays as they travel through the eyes, which is called refraction.[2] This leads “the refractive image formed by the cornea and the lens to fall in front of the photoreceptors of the retina.”[3][4] 

While near vision, such as staring at computer screens, will result in ‘accommodative fatigue” on the ciliary muscles, the lens and zonular fibres of the eyes, there is no consensus on the causes of myopia. Research indicates that eye strain is one of many possible mechanisms responsible for the regulation of eye growth that includes outdoor activities and sunlight.[5]

The use of low-dose atropine drops has been shown to slow the progression of myopia in childhood. After adolescence, the condition typically stabilizes and is corrected with eyeglasses, contact lenses or with refractive surgery. “High myopia” defined as -5 Diopter or greater is associated with risks of rare degenerative eye conditions.

Any tension in the cranial bones, ligaments, meninges or other structures could in theory contribute to myopia. This can be related to birth trauma or head injuries in infancy or childhood. The modern understanding of fascia as part of a tensegrity system suggests that this tension may also arise from the vertebral spine, particularly in the neck muscles that coordinate vision and head movement. A 2010 study looked at osteopathy in the treatment of myopia in young adults. The study found a beneficial effects on visual function in adults with cranial asymmetry.[6] 

 

RELEVANT KITS

Human Skeleton sans vertebrae

https://www.ergopathics.com/products/human-skeleton-sans-vertebrae

Eyes & Seeing

https://www.ergopathics.com/products/eyes-seeing

Cranial nerves

https://www.ergopathics.com/products/lwp-ph6d-cranial-nerves

 

NOTES

[1] https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/20008719/

[2] https://www.aoa.org/healthy-eyes/eye-and-vision-conditions/myopia?sso=y

[3] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK470669/

[4] https://www.nature.com/articles/s41433-018-0139-7

[5] https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/23462271/

[6] https://www.degruyter.com/document/doi/10.7556/jaoa.2010.110.4.239/html



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