Exploring The Body Electric in Natural Health Practice 

Exploring The Body Electric in Natural Health Practice 

 

by Heather Fraser

For centuries western physicians have pondered over and experimented with the body’s electrical system using technology – from Galvani’s 18thcentury electricity experiments with frogs legs and Mesmer’s magnetic tub to patented galvanic body coils and ‘electrotherapeutics’ taught at late 19th and even early 20th century medical schools. 

Mary Shelley’s electrifying vision in Frankenstein notwithstanding, the results of the Tesla coil, radionics, and the Rife generator in health were promising. And while these devices were overshadowed by the rise of pharmaceuticals in managing health at the start of the 20th century, such technologies have persisted – with the help of traditional Eastern teachings. 

As Western physicians in history explored physical energy through technology, Eastern health practice offered a much simpler and less invasive approach through the meridian system (and other systems including chakras). 

Traditional Chinese Medicine discovered the ability to calm pain and reduce inflammation through the stimulation of specific points along these invisible energetic pathways using acupuncture or acupressure. 

But meridians have remained so much myth to many North American physicians. Even the experiments of team of intrepid French physicians in the 1980s seemed to have had little impact. 

Using volunteers, the French doctors injected radioactive tracers into classic meridians points. The results, documented with a gamma ray camera, were impressive. Images of the tracers moving at 3cm – 6cm per minute along meridians were published in The Journal of Nuclear Medicine (1992). 

Eastern thought finally merged with Western technology when German physicians began to explore the effects of stimulating the meridian system with electro-acupressure to enhance energetic communication between the nervous system and the immune and endocrine systems. This approach was pioneered by physician and engineer Reinhard Voll in the 1950’s. In the 1990s, Pediatrician Peter Schumacher used the technology and electro-magnetic frequency vials to help atopic children. In his book Bio-physical Therapy of Allergies, he was clear about the potential and the limits of his work as well as how much we have yet to learn. 

Electro-acupressure modalities that grew from this work and that use Ergopathics frequency vials such as Bicom, EAV, Bio-energetic Resonance (BER) and more have become common amongst holistic health practitioners. 

I was introduced to the use of electro-acupressure technology in 2006. Following in the footsteps of Peter Schumacher, I learned first about Ergopathics electro- magnetic frequencies of substances in glass vials to identify dissonance and resonance in muscle testing. 

Once the dissonant frequencies have been identified the electro-acupressure technology is used to reintroduce this bio-information through specific meridian points. Key to success with this modality is an understanding that everything, even emotions and thoughts, have frequencies. Having accepted that (and more including the role of intention) a world of possibilities opens up. 

For example, a client suddenly struggling to digest food after a stressful event had become dissonant to the frequencies of some pancreatic enzymes. This we determined by muscle testing the entire box of digestive enzymes – the client placed her elbow on the box and tested weak. We then went through the vials in groups of three, then individually using the vial-testing block. There were several dissonant frequencies.

While we used electro-acupressure to promote homeostasis in this instance, there are other energy-based and consciousness-based modalities that use the vials to promote balance. These include BodyTalk, NAET, acupuncture, applied kinesiology, chiropractic, tapping protocols and so many more. 

Western health practitioners have come a long way since the days of Galvani. 



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